Recent Posts

Is your dryer a ticking time bomb.

6/27/2018 (Permalink)

How safe is your dryer?

Here are some fire prevention tips from The National Fire Prevention Association

• Have your dryer installed and serviced by a professional. 

• Do not use the dryer without a lint filter. 

• Make sure you clean the lint filter before or after each load of laundry. Remove lint that has collected around the drum.

• Rigid or flexible metal venting material should be used to sustain proper air flow and drying time.

• Make sure the air exhaust vent pipe is not restricted and the outdoor vent flap will open when the dryer is operating. Once a year, or more often if you notice that it is taking longer than normal for your clothes to dry, clean lint out of the vent pipe or have a dryer lint removal service do it for you.

• Keep dryers in good working order. Gas dryers should be inspected by a qualified professional to make sure that the gas line and connection are intact and free of leaks.

• Make sure the right plug and outlet are used and that the machine is connected properly. • Follow the manufacturer’s operating instructions and don’t overload your dryer.

• Turn the dryer off if you leave home or when you

The leading cause of home dryer fires is failure to clean them!

Water Damage Timeline

6/27/2018 (Permalink)

When it comes to water damage it is never a good idea to wait. Check out this timeline to see what typically happens during a water damage. 

Water Damage Timeline

Within Minutes

  • Water quickly spreads throughout your property, saturating everything in its path.
  • Water is absorbed into walls, floors, upholstery, and belongings.
  • Furniture finishes may bleed, causing permanent staining on carpets.
  • Photographs, books, and other paper goods start to swell and warp.

Hours 1 - 24:

  • Drywall begins to swell and break down.
  • Metal surfaces begin to tarnish.
  • Furniture begins to swell and crack.
  • Dyes and inks from cloth and paper goods spread and stain.
  • A musty odor appears.

48 Hours to 1 Week:

  • Mold and mildew may grow and spread.
  • Doors, windows, and studs swell and warp.
  • Metal begins to rust and corrode.
  • Furniture warps and shows signs of mold.
  • Paint begins to blister.
  • Wood flooring swells and warps.
  • Serious biohazard contamination is possible.

More Than 1 Week:

  • Restoration time and cost increase dramatically; replacing contaminated materials and structural rebuilding may be extensive.
  • Structural safety, mold growth, and biohazard contaminants pose serious risks to occupants.

Industrial Hygienist

6/26/2018 (Permalink)

If you suspect you have a mold issue give us a call today at 508-533-5305! If you suspect you have an issue but are unable to actually see the mold you may need what we in the industry call an Industrial Hygienist to come out and do some testing.

The company we turn to is always Oasis Environmental. 

For over fifteen years, Oasis Environmental Contracting Services, Inc. (Oasis) has been providing quality environmental advice and support to there valued clients. Oasis is veterans owned business/registered with CCR Cage/NCAGE 5KC12.

Oasis provides an eclectic array of environmental services and products, and we specialize in Environmental Investigations. Their meticulous and unique forensic approach provides clients with the historic data considered necessary to formulate options and make educated decisions regarding difficult environmental questions.

Matthew E. Montefusco, CHMM, CMC, CES, founded Oasis on the premise that individuals faced with environmental problems prefer and deserve a calm place (an Oasis) to obtain sensible and cost effective solutions to their particular situation. With Mr. Montefusco's twenty-nine plus years of environmental experience and the diligent efforts of the Oasis conscientious staff, environmental problems can be solved in a professional manner with the client's best interest in mind. 

For more information contact our office at SERVPRO of Stoughton/Sharon 

CDC Facts on Mold

6/26/2018 (Permalink)

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's website:

There is always some mold everywhere – in the air and on many surfaces. Molds have been on the Earth for millions of years. Mold grows where there is moisture.

Mold and Your Home

Mold is found both indoors and outdoors. Mold can enter your home through open doorways, windows, vents, and heating and air conditioning systems. Mold in the air outside can also attach itself to clothing, shoes, bags, and pets can and be carried indoors.

Mold will grow in places with a lot of moisture, such as around leaks in roofs, windows, or pipes, or where there has been flooding. Mold grows well on paper products, cardboard, ceiling tiles, and wood products. Mold can also grow in dust, paints, wallpaper, insulation, drywall, carpet, fabric, and upholstery.

If you suspect the presents of mold in your house please give our expects a call at SERVPRO of Stoughton/Sharon 781-341-1946

What's Covered?

6/26/2018 (Permalink)

When is comes to water damage issues the best way to know what is covered and what isn't is to check your policy or ask you insurance agent.

Here is a standard list of what may or may not typically be covered. Remember everyone's policy is different and the best person to answer your coverage questions is always your agent! 

- Burst Pipes and Leaks – Typically Covered

-Water Damage From Appliances – Typically     Covered

- Roof Leaks – Typically Covered

- Flood Damage – Typically Not Covered

- Backed Up Drain or Sewer Line – Typically Not     Covered

- Ground Water Seepage – Typically Not Covered

- Mold – Possibly Covered

If you or a friend has experienced water damage due to any of the above listed issues give our office a call. We are available 24 hours a day to help with all your water damage needs. 

SERVPRO of Stoughton/Sharon - 781-341-1946

Understanding Category and Class during water Damage.

6/26/2018 (Permalink)

According to the IICRC S500 Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Water Damage Restoration

There are 3 Basic Categories of Water

Category 1 originates from a sanitary source and poses no substantial risk from dermal, ingestion, or inhalation exposure. However, it may not always remain clean after it comes into contact with other surfaces or materials.

Category 2 contains significant contamination and has the potential to cause discomfort or sickness if contacted or consumed by humans. It may contain potentially unsafe levels of microorganisms or nutrients for microorganisms, as well as other organic or inorganic matter (chemical or biological).

Category 3 is grossly contaminated and may contain pathogenic, toxigenic or other harmful agents. Such water sources may carry silt, organic matter, pesticides, heavy metals, regulated materials, or toxic organic substances.

Time and temperature can also affect the quality of water, thereby changing its category. *Refer to the IICRC S500 for complete definitions.

The 4 Primary Classifications of Water Damage

Class 1 is the least amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  It affects only part of a room or area, or larger areas containing materials that have absorbed minimal moisture.  Little or no wet carpet and/or cushion is present.

Class 2 involves a large amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  It affects at least an entire room of carpet and cushion (pad).  Water has wicked up walls less than 24 inches.  There is moisture remaining in structural materials and substructure soil.

Class 3 involves the greatest amount of water, absorption and evaporation.  Water may have come from overhead.  Ceilings, walls, insulation, carpet, cushion and subfloor in virtually all of the entire area are saturated.

Class 4 relates to specialty drying situations.  Wet materials with very low permeance/porosity (eg. hardwood, plaster, brick, concrete, light-weight concrete and stone).  Typically, there are deep pockets of saturation, which require very low specific humidity.  These types of losses may require longer drying times and special methods.

*Refer to the IICRC S500 for complete definitions. 

How safe is your child's sleepover?

6/26/2018 (Permalink)

Check out these tips for a safe sleepover from the National Fire Protection Association.

NFPA offers this free Sleepover Checklist to help parents and caregivers consider the hazards, and make decisions about slumber parties and sleepovers.

Before you say yes

  • How well do you know the home?
  • Is the home clean?
  • Does it appear to be structurally sound?
  • Is the home in a safe area?
  • If the home has security bars on doors and windows, do you know for certain that the bars have quick release devices inside, so your child could get out in an emergency?
  • Is your child comfortable in the home and with all the occupants?
  • Are you comfortable leaving your child in the home overnight?

How well do you know the parent(s)?

  • Are they mature, responsible and conscientious?
  • Will they supervise the children throughout the stay?
  • Are they cautious with smoking materials, matches and lighters, and candles?

Ask the parents

  • Are there working smoke alarms on every level, inside and outside each sleeping area?
  • Are the alarms interconnected?
  • Do they have a well-rehearsed fire escape plan that includes two ways out and a meeting place outside?
  • Where will your child be sleeping?
  • Is there a smoke alarm in the room?
  • Are there two escape routes from the room?
  • Will the parents walk through their escape plan with your child?
  • Do the parents prohibit bedroom candle use by children?

House Hold Tips to prevent water damage

6/13/2018 (Permalink)

  • Check for loose or leaky gutters.  Improper drainage can lead to water in the basement or crawl space. Make sure downspouts drain away from the foundation and are clear and free of debris.
  • Low areas in the yard or next to the foundation should be filled with compacted soil. Spring rains can cause yard flooding, which can lead to foundation flooding and damage. Also, when water pools in these low areas in summer, it creates a breeding ground for insects.
  • Use a screwdriver to probe the wood trim around windows, doors, railings and decks.  Make repairs now before the spring rains do more damage to the exposed wood.
  • From the ground, examine roof shingles to see if any were lost or damaged during winter. If your home has an older roof covering, you may want to start a budget for replacement. The summer sun can really damage roof shingles. Shingles that are cracked, buckled or loose or are missing granules need to be replaced. Flashing around plumbing vents, skylights and chimneys need to be checked and repaired by a qualified roofer.
  • Examine the exterior of the chimney for signs of damage. Have the flue cleaned and inspected by a certified chimney sweep.
  • Inspect concrete slabs for signs of cracks or movement.  All exterior slabs except pool decks should drain away from the home's foundation. Fill cracks with a concrete crack filler or silicone caulk. When weather permits, power-wash and then seal the concrete.
  • Remove firewood stored near the home.  Firewood should be stored at least 18 inches off the ground at least 2 feet from the structure.
  • Check outside hose faucets for freeze damage. Turn the water on and place your thumb or finger over the opening. If you can stop the flow of water, it is likely the pipe inside the home is damaged and will need to be replaced. While you're at it, check the garden hose for dry rot.
  • Have a qualified heating and cooling contractor clean and service the outside unit of the air conditioning system. Clean coils operate more efficiently, and an annual service call will keep the system working at peak performance levels. Change interior filters on a regular basis.
  • Check your gas- and battery-powered lawn equipment to make sure it is ready for summer use. Clean equipment and sharp cutting blades will make yard work easier.

Ultrasonic Cleaning

6/13/2018 (Permalink)

As a homeowner or even a renter, one of our biggest fears is losing everything we own to a natural disaster, especially the items that are most sentimental to us. When a natural disaster hits, it is much more than just a physical burden, it also takes a mental toll with everything that now needs cleaned and repaired. There are many different methods of cleaning, depending on the type of damages that are done, but one specific way could truly salvage items that you might have just given up on in the past. This method of cleaning is called Ultrasonic Content Cleaning.

Ultrasonic Content Cleaning uses cavitation action to access even the smallest of crevices on damaged objects. Cavitation is the formation of vapor cavities in liquid, meaning small bubbles that implode to send powerful shockwaves of pressure across the damaged or dirty object, successfully removing residue. This process can send the cleaning fluid in places that a hand cannot reach to clean.

According to TovaTech, the restoration process for smoke and water damaged articles includes a couple of different steps. First the objects are placed into mesh baskets where they are pre-washed with high agitation to remove as much loose residue as possible. Next, they are placed into the ultrasonic cleaning tank for the cavitation action to take place.  The bubbles from the cleaning fluid make their way through the items, removing the last of the remnants thoroughly cleaning the, what used to be, damaged items. The rinse station is next where the flowing reverse osmosis water (water that was put through a membrane removing tap water impurities) removes the soap residue and leaves that clean final touch. The last 5 minutes of the cleaning process go to the drying tunnel where the dyer covers the items in a continuous, down draft, hot air to make its way back to the customer.

According to besttechnologyinc.com, the assembly line layout of the Ultrasonic technology can improve cleaning and labor times by as much as 75%. This process has saved tons of money by restoring products instead of having to replace them. Items that look like they could never be used again have been restored back to beautiful looking items. Don’t give up on your items next time and give the ultrasonic cleaning a try.

Tips

6/13/2018 (Permalink)

We’re always told that if disaster strikes, we are to remain calm, cool and collected, but when that time hits, it’s hard to always put those words to action. Although there is a lot of chaos in that moment, it is still very important to stay organized and calm from the beginning of the disaster to the end of the restoration.

Steps to clearing the chaos –

  • First, call your insurance agent to get the claim filed as soon as possible to get the insurance adjustor to your home.
  • Next, call a local restoration team to assess the damage as soon as possible and get working on the damage so it does not get worse over time.
  • Keep a binder and notepad with all of the information that you’re receiving from your insurance provider and restoration professionals. (During this hectic time, don’t rely on remembering everything just off the top of your head)
  • Last, but not least, make sure to save all receipts and documentation you receive pertaining to the incident and only give copies when requested; keep the originals.

Now that we’ve gone through the steps to do, here are some steps NOT to do when involved in this situation. 

  • Make sure not to wire any soot damage from walls, ceilings or other absorbent surfaces. 
  • Do not keep or use carpet or furniture that has been heavily damaged by the residue as this is unhealthy.
  • Dispose of any canned goods or food items that were exposed to the extreme heat.
  • Do not turn on any electronic devices until they’re thoroughly inspected by a professional to make sure there isn’t electrical damage.

Hopefully no one will ever have to go through these events, but if it does occur, these steps will help you keep that calm and collected mindset to get through the unfortunate.